History

Making a Positive Difference for Over 40 Years

Since 1973, we have helped individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities achieve their independence. For over 40 years, TECH has expanded our facilities to better serve clients and help them achieve their dreams of becoming active, valued members of the community.

Today

TECH Art Gallery and Administrative offices open at The Wiley Building in Downtown Hutchinson.

The new TECH Art Studio is completed.

TECH undergoes a brand change with new logo.

TECH-color no background

State of Kansas moves to managed care system for people with disabilities.

 

TECH’s Adult Life Skills program (ALS) moves to a new home in the former Midwest Feed Building, 14 West Ave B.

First year TECH participates in Third Thursday downtown.

Local artists volunteer to work with clients and help create TECH Art Program.

 

TECH approved as a Kansas Department of Health and Environment solid waste processing/reclamation facility (e-waste) and receives its first semi-trailer load of items from a regional customer.

TECH begins an electronics waste recycling program (e-cycle).

Kroger Digital Imaging project begins, employing 2 full-time staff and up to 6 TECH clients.

First Annual Downtown Hutch Uncorked for TECH wine festival is held.

Holiday Festival (former Tree Festival) celebrates 25 years.

First annual Main Street Hops for TECH is held and wins Governor’s Award for Excellence.  One year later, the First Annual Brewmaster’s Dinner is held as a part of this event.

EEC celebrates 40 years of serving children in Reno County.

Interfaith Housing Services and Hutchinson Correctional Facility build a new group home for TECH clients.

Thanks to community donations, the Computer TECHnology Lab opens, opening the world of technology to TECH clients.

Computer/TECHnology Lab begins with 6 working stations.

Interfaith Housing & TECH join forces to build a new duplex for 6 clients.

TECH clients utilize the new Reno County Area Transportation System (Rcat), giving them greater independence and access to the community.

Shredding contract started to employ TECH clients and use existing bailing equipment.  We shredded 800,000 lbs the first year.

AKTION Club of Hutchinson begins, sponsored by local Kiwanis.

Maurice Cummings retires as President/CEO. He is awarded the Distinguished Leadership Award by InterHab. Brenda Maxey becomes the second President/CEO in TECH’s history.

TECH begins the client retirement and end of life transition programs.

The Kansas legislature passes an act creating Community Development Disability Organizations (CDDO’s).  TECH is designated as CDDO for Reno County.

The Hearts and Hands for TECH Auxilary is formed.  The group of volunteers plans fundraising activities and assists with TECH events.

The “Gatsby House” project was updated to become the “Veranda House,” an entirely new house to be built and auctioned off.

Name is changed back to Training and Evaluation Center of Hutchinson, Inc. and a new logo was created (t-man).

Two new group home opens at 906 East 27th Street and 1705 Landon.

A bequest from the estate of Theodore and Mildred Miller starts the TECH Foundation of Kansas endowment fund.

A fund drive is launched for EEC to raise $300,000 to ensure continuation of services.

Early Ed Center moves into new facility at 303 E Bigger.

Name is changed to Training and Evaluation Center for the Handicapped, Inc.

A building at 1300 East Ave A is leased for administrative offices (formerly Master Machine Tool building).

A building is purchased at 3000 East Ave B to house the Training Center.

The first annual Tree Festival (now known as TECH Holiday Festival) is held in the lobby of First National Bank.

4 new group homes are opened.

Interagency agreement formed between USD 308, RCEC, and TECH to provide services to children ages birth to 4.

Name is changed to Training and Evaluation Center of Hutchinson, Inc.

The Early Education Center admits children with disabilities, ages 3 to 6, free of charge to parents.

First group home opened at 500 East Ave A. Neighbors first oppose concept of the home, then welcome it with opened arms.

Early Education Center approved as a United Way agency.

Reno Occupational Center opens its doors in the Emerson Carey Building with 5 clients. Maurice Cummings is hired as its first director.

The Beginning